Molyneux wants your money for Curiosity 
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Geoffrey Tim
November 12, 2012 at 3:00 pm

CuriosityCat

Peter Molyneux, he of 22 cans and formerly of Microsoft and Lionhead has released his odd social experiment, curiosity, that has hundreds of thousands of people across the globe tapping at their mobile devices to uncover boring pictures in the hope of being the person to tap the very last block, and win something “life changing.”

And now? Now he’s asking for your money to help people keep tapping at blocks.

The point of curiosity is to have players all over the world tapping at the same ridiculously large cube to remove smaller blocks, layer by layer to reveal…something. Unfortunately it’s not working as planned; because of the ridiculous number of people who’re actually actively engaging in the social experiment, the “game’s” servers have fallen over – and 22 Cans now needs your money to keep the thing going.

“We may need help to make the experience truly wonderful, our server costs are going to ramp up with our new fix,” Molyneux explained.

22 Cans’ Website has the following plea:

“We are a small independent developer and due to popular demand we now offer the option for kind people to donate, so that we can make Curiosity the best possible experience it can be. However big or small the donation; it will really help us make Curiosity better.”

I had some mild interest in Curiosity, downloading and doing my own tapping – but I was bored after the first day. It’s inane, unfun, and completely pointless – but if you’re up for some braindead block tapping, you can donate to the cause via Paypal here. Peter Molyneux wants money for this? I though he was mental before…

I'm old, grumpy and more than just a little cynical. One day, I found myself in possession of a NES, and a copy of Super Mario Bros 3. It was that game that made me realise that games were more than just toys to idly while away time - they were capable of being masterpieces. I'm here now, looking for more of those masterpieces. I am also the emperor of the backend